The fall of Constantinople to the Turks officially began on the fifth of April, 1453, although it may be interesting to note that prior to this.

The Turks, which was at that point being led by Sultan Mehmed II, were in many ways being targeted by the influence of the Roman Catholic Church (at that point led by Pope Eugenious IV, who invoked the union of the Catholic and the Orthodox Churches).

Fall of Constantinople to the Turks

In retaliation, the Turks began to engineer the fall of Constantinople to the Turks by means of building forts along the Strait of Dardanelles, one of the most major areas of defense of Constantinople and the Byzantines.

On the fifth of April, 1453, the fall of Constantinople to the Turks officially commenced in the form of an attack from a Turkish army of more than a hundred thousand men, easily outnumbering the defenders of the city, which numbered at only seven thousand able-bodied men.

Fall of Constantinople to the TurksThe attacks on the fortified walls of the city had been ceaseless, as Constantinople strongholds fell left and right. Even the arrival of Christian aid was not enough to stop the onslaught, and it did not take too long before the city was surrounded by Turks. Despite the attacks on the walls, the fall of Constantinople to the Turks ultimately happened because of an unlocked gate which the Turks did not fail to take advantage of. Exhausted with no prospect of relief from allies, Constantinople fell.